Alter Ego

Litigation Engagements

• On behalf of defendants – an environmental services business and one of its owners – who were sued by a disgruntled customer who had obtained a default judgment against a related environmental services business that had ceased operations. Because he was unable to collect on the judgment from the defunct entity, the customer wished to pierce the corporate veil to collect from the assets of another business owned by the same persons and from the personal assets of one of its and the defunct entity’s owners – in state district court in Texas.

• On behalf of defendants – the owners of a multi-family residential real estate development and property management company – who were also the owners of a related limited liability company that had invested in a maker of ophthalmic laser surgical devices that later sought protection under the federal bankruptcy laws and who were personally sued by a fellow shareholder of that business who wished to pierce the limited liability company veil to collect from them a judgment against the limited liability company that had also sought protection under the federal bankruptcy laws – in federal district court in California.

• On behalf of defendant – a multinational public conglomerate in the energy business – that, along with others, was sued under CERCLA for environmental cleanup costs associated with a Superfund site in Texas at which a then-liquidated subsidiary was alleged to have dumped hazardous waste products, a circumstance that prompted the government to make alter ego claims in an attempt to pierce the corporate veil and reach the assets of the then-liquidated subsidiary’s parent — in federal district court in Texas.

• On behalf of defendants – brother-sister corporations in the energy business – that were sued by a subsidiary of a regulated public utility, the joint venture partner of one of the brother-sister corporations in a gas gathering system, that was making alter ego claims in an attempt to pierce the corporate veil and reach the assets of the brother-sister corporation that was not its joint venture partner — in state court in Texas.


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